Blue Screen of Death on Windows 10

Category: Windows-10

Windows 10 is the most stable version of the operating system to date. Still, it's not unheard of to see the dreaded Blue Screen of Death suddenly pop up. It's a serious warning of a major problem in your system and should not be ignored. Here's what to do if you encounter the Blue Screen of Death on Windows 10...

Fixing the Blue Screen of Death on Windows 10

Technically, the Blue Screen of Death is known as a "stop error." Windows brings everything to a complete, sudden stop "to prevent damage to your computer." The cause of a stop error may lie in hardware or software, and it can be very difficult to track down. Here are a few guidelines to debugging the Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) on Windows 10.

An overheated CPU can cause a BSOD error. If your cooling fan is running constantly, you may need to take steps to cool things down inside of your computer case. Blow out dust. Replace heat sink thermal grease. If the cooling fan does not spin freely, install a new one or lubricate the bearing. Laptops may benefit from a lap pad designed to circulate cool air beneath the laptop. (See my article Do You Know Your Computer's Worst Enemy? for more tips on dealing with overheating.)

Bad RAM memory can cause the Blue Screen of Death error. You can run the Windows 10 memory check diagnostic routine to check your system memory. Close any open files or programs, click the Start button, type mdsched.exe and press Enter. Next, click "Restart now and check for problems". Your computer will restart and run the memory diagnostic. The results of the test will be in the Windows Event Viewer.

BSOD Windows 10

Hard disk errors may cause a BSOD error. Run the error-checking tool on your boot drive's Properties page to find and fix errors. It's also a good idea to defragment hard drives regularly to minimize errors. See my related articles [CAUTION] Hard Drive Makes a Clicking Sound? and [FREE] Tools to Tune and Optimize Your Hard Drive for more help with this.

Software errors that cause a BSOD can occur when Windows 10 does not shut down properly. Loss of power during shutdown is the most common cause of such errors. Using System Restore to restore your Windows settings to an earlier configuration may resolve a BSOD problem. See my article Try System Restore for Windows 10 to learn more about System Restore.

More BSOD Fix Options

Check the Security and Maintenance Center to see if there are any known problems or unresolved configuration errors. Click Start and type "Security and Maintenance" in the search box, then press Enter. Under the Maintenance heading, there's a link to "View reliability history". You'll be able to see if any software or system components have been malfunctioning.

Finally, Windows 10 has a Reset option that may help to resolve a Blue Screen error. See my article [RESET BUTTON] Restore Your PC To Factory Defaults?. A Reset will install a fresh copy of the Windows operating system, while keeping all your personal files intact.

When all else fails to cure a recurring Blue Screen of Death, you may have to take the machine to a service center or ship it to the manufacturer for diagnosis and repair. Hopefully, the machine is still under warranty as this can be expensive. Be sure to make backup copies of all essential data before sending the machine in for repairs, and delete any sensitive data from the hard drive before turning it over to strangers.

Have you experienced the BSOD on a Windows 10 computer? Post your comment or question below...

 
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This article was posted by on 28 Feb 2020


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Most recent comments on "Blue Screen of Death on Windows 10"

Posted by:

Perry
28 Feb 2020

I had this problem recently, but it was a software file int he OS that caused it, and Dell Support (India) could not repair it. Every time I booted, it just failed to start Windows and you could not do anything else. I have backup, so it was decided to format and reload, but the Dell techs didn't want to use my emergency file on USB, so they went the route of loading Windows and could never get it to work as it did not recognize my wifi so could not finish the download. They finally gave up and panned to send someone out. I got tired of waiting, so I used the rescue USB and got it up fiarly quickly and reloaded from backup. So much for paying for extended warranty policy. They should pay me


Posted by:

James
28 Feb 2020

By default, Windows 10 is set to auto restart after a BSOD. It can be hard to diagnose the error message on the BSOD because the restart can happen much too soon. I always disable this setting when using Windows 10. It is found under System Properties, Startup and Recovery, System failure.


Posted by:

Ostap Hawaleshka
28 Feb 2020

When I try to access your "Windows 10 Repair Tools - Higly recommended by you, my security system will now allow it, citing PUP.
Interesting!


Posted by:

hifi5000
28 Feb 2020

In the late 1990s,I had a machine that ran Windows 1998 that would go into the Blue Screen of Death occasionally.As I wasn't fully versed on the tech of the machine like RAM or PSUs,I had a heck of a time trying to fix it.

Looking back,I probably had bad memory or a bad fan.I didn't known about the MEM 86+ test,otherwise I would have been able to fix it myself like I do nowadays.


Posted by:

Tony S
28 Feb 2020

Sick and tired of updates going wrong. Tries for hours to install and then takes even longer to uninstall. This is a new machine with new software. Upgraded from 32-bit Windows 10 to 64 bit with 16GB RAM. Now machine doesn't know what it is as it says it's still 3,1 GB RAM. Next time Linux


Posted by:

11bravo
28 Feb 2020

Enable crash dumps. Then use free program WhoCrashed (www.resplendence.com)to analyze dump. Most often cause is a problem driver, but not enough info on which driver. Still, it can eliminate a hardware cause, and encourage one to update drivers.


Posted by:

Paul Breaux
28 Feb 2020

Blue Screen of Death, means something else that you haven't mentioned. I always use a Windows OS, and some years ago I experienced one, that suddenly POPPED UP on the screen, claiming this was a WARNING to BLOCK AN ATTEMPT OF TAKING OVER CONTROL OF MY COMPUTER. And it had a LINK BUTTON, which they claimed would KEEP IT FROM HAPPENING. Like a JERK, I clicked on the button, it loaded it's CONTROL ATTACK software, and that was that. I DID THE EXACT THING, NO ONE SHOULD DO. I CLICKED ON IT.

After starting at an asking price of $5,000 from me to free it back, I simply told them if I had $5,000, they could shove this pc, you know where. The 4 or 5 I spoke with, had Hispanic accents, and I finally agreed to $150.00, and paid on line to them. I got the pc back again. I contacted the FTC about it, demanding they stop trash like this, and that I felt my ID had been stolen from me. The FTC sent me paperwork on the Identity Theft, and over 2 YEARS LATER, I received a check from the FTC, worth $300.00, $150 for what I paid them, plus $150 to pay for my trouble. The FTC finally caught up, took to court, and they had to pay big bucks for what they did. I really appreciated that the FTC had actually did something about it.

I felt, that if I had not clicked on the BUTTON they showed, instead clicking on the power button itself and turn the computer off, when I'd have restarted it again, there would be NO DAMN BLUE SCREEN OF DEATH to worry about. But the BLUE SCREEN, FROZE ME, and this is what happened.


Posted by:

Bill
28 Feb 2020

Bob, you wrote: "Windows 10 is the most stable version of the operating system to date." ...
Really? Maybe I'm just being nostalgic, but for my money, XP was the best Windows version I've experienced. I hated to see Microsoft dump it, and replace with the garbage versions of the following years.


Posted by:

Kathi A Anderson
28 Feb 2020

Your comments on the Blue Screen of Death regarding Hard Drives seemed to refer only to pre-SSD HDs. I don't think it is recommended to defragment SSDs.


Posted by:

GWC
28 Feb 2020

Just went through the BSOD in Windows 10. It occurred right after a Microsoft Update (might have been coincidental) but a WD Black Hard drive failed, every time windows tried to restart, it kept getting worse. That computer just was fixed with a new SSD and a Panasonic HD. Up and running with a tremendous loss of data except I followed your instructions a done a backup losing only 4 days of data.


Posted by:

Bernie Crowley
28 Feb 2020

You taught me to use Macrium Reflect, and now I am teaching others. If disaster strikes, I am ready.


Posted by:

Phil
28 Feb 2020

Hi Bob, I was greeted with the BSOD January of 2019. My C: drive failed. Replaced the drive and reinstalled the OS.

Thankfully I've taken your advise about back ups over the years. I was up and running in a little over three hours with no data loss.

Thanks for your great advise.


Posted by:

Wild Bill
29 Feb 2020

Bob, I have been given to understand that modern Windows does a decent job of "defragging", in the background, without manual help. And in the case of SSD's, I have been told you neither need nor want to defrag them. I hope this is good info.


Posted by:

Keith Blair
01 Mar 2020

I have to disagree with Bob and agree with Bill, XP was the most reliable OS Microsoft has ever released. Updated from XP to Win 10 2 years ago and am still disappointed. Files magically disappear and every update brings more problems. Luckily I back everything up on my other computer still running XP


Posted by:

RandiO
01 Mar 2020

We had a brand-new IBM Selectric III (Model 6701), which never BlueScreened. During an office Breaking-and-Entry event; instead of unplugging its nine-foot AC power cord, the thieves must have attempted to cut it off at the rear of the unit. We could not figure out why our prized Selectric was still in the office. We had a good laugh when we realized the fuse for that wall outlet was tripped and we found a pair of dykes (w/blue handles) on the other side of the office.
This is as close to a “Blue Shock of Death” (BSOD) that Selectric ever got; for over five years of subsequent and continuous usage. 😊


Posted by:

Phil
01 Mar 2020

I feel cheated. I've never had the BSOD and I've been using PCs since the DOS days.


Posted by:

charlie
01 Mar 2020

Thanks for the BSOD message, it just reminds me that these things happen and we need to have back-ups in case they do.


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